Paul Nkhata


Recent Posts

Village Savings Provide Nutritional Lessons

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 10, 2019 12:08:00 PM / by Paul Nkhata posted in Economic Empowerment, Impact Stories, Malawi, WV

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Witness was widowed some years ago. In her early 60’s, she had to endure the burden of taking care of 7 grandchildren because their parents (her two elderly children) trekked to South Africa in search of greener pastures. As such, she single-handedly took over the responsibility of looking after the grandchildren with little support from their biological parents in South Africa. Her adult children held only menial jobs and sending support back home is difficult due to legal constraints.

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A Woman of Economic Influence

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 15, 2019 10:00:00 AM / by Paul Nkhata posted in Economic Empowerment, Impact Stories, Malawi, WV

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Grace and her son inspect the corn

Lack of economic independence is one of the plights of many African women, especially in rural areas. In many African countries, men are the bread winners. This was true of Grace Njikho of Kamphalo village in Chikwina-Mpamba Area Program in Malawi. Married over 31 years and a mother of 5 children, she depended on her husband for everything. She never engaged in any form of business to gain income or supplement what her husband earned. For her, being married, meant the husband had to shoulder total responsibility for everything. “Before the THRIVE Project, I could hardly think of engaging in any form of micro enterprise for additional income for our household. I thought my husband was there to provide everything for the home,” said Grace.

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A Changed Mind, Heart and Pocket

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 21, 2018 8:08:34 PM / by Paul Nkhata posted in Economic Empowerment, Impact Stories, Malawi, THRIVE, WV

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Liyana Zenasi hails from Zenasi village in Chilenje Area Program in Malawi. She is married to Enosi and together, they have 4 children, age ranging from 6 to 18. For years, they have engaged in rain-fed subsistence farming, using traditional farming methods and with no involvement into micro enterprise. Providing for the family’s basic needs and supporting children with school supplies was an uphill task. They could hardly harvest enough from their fields and had no other source of income.

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